Quality & Safety

Quality & Safety

 

Improving Quality & Patient Safety

BID-Milton's Healthcare Quality Department oversees the hospital's mission to deliver the best possible care with the least risk of injury or infection.  Whether working to minimize patient falls or reduce the incidence of a particular infection, Milton Hospital monitors and regularly reports its quality outcomes to several quality-monitoring agencies. 

On this page, you will find our most current quality data for many key measurements.  In addition, you may also follow the link below each box to view public sites where the data can be found.  Please note that in most cases, data reported on this page is more current than data found on public reporting sites.

Below are our recent quality scores on several important quality measures.  All scores reflect the most current data available.

Click on a category on the list below to view our quality scores for that topic:

 

Patient Falls

Confused, immobile or incontinent patients are often at the highest risk for falling in a hospital.  While completely eliminating patient falls may be unrealistic, BID-Milton follows a fall reduction program supported by evidence-based practices.  The program has resulted in an overall fall rate consistently lower than state and national averages.

This data is publicly reported on PatientCareLink, a healthcare quality monitoring site of the Massachusetts Hospital Association.  Data reported on this site is often 6-12 months more current than data presented on quality monitoring websites.    Click here to view our data as reported on this site.  

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Pressure Ulcers

A pressure ulcer is an area of the skin that breaks down when you stay in one position for too long.  Depending on a patient's condition, pressure ulcers can begin to develop within hours, and if left untreated, can worsen into very serious and painful wounds.  As a result of ongoing training and prevention protocols, BID-Milton  has all but eliminated serious pressure ulcers that develop during a patient's hospitalization, reflecting a steadfast commitment to patient safety and nursing excellence.

This data is publicly reported on PatientCareLink, a healthcare quality monitoring site of the Massachusetts Hospital Association.  Data reported on this site is often 6-12 months more current than data presented on quality monitoring websites.    Click here to view our data as reported on this site.  

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Surgical Measurements (SCIP)

Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) measurements track a hospital's quality of patient care before, during and after a surgical procedure.  Consistently high performance in these areas have proven to reduce surgical complications, including infection and heart complications. 

This data is publicly reported on Hospital Compare, a healthcare quality monitoring site of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  Data reported on this site is often 6-12 months more current than data presented on quality monitoring websites.    Click here to view our data as reported on this site.   

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Pneumonia Prevention 

Pneumonia is a serious lung infection that causes difficulty breathing, fever, cough and fatigue. These measures show some of the aspects of care for pneumonia.

This data is publicly reported on Hospital Compare, a healthcare quality monitoring site of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  Data reported on this site is often 6-12 months more current than data presented on quality monitoring websites.    Click here to view our data as reported on this site.   

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Congestive Heart Failure

Heart Failure is a weakening of the heart's pumping power. With heart failure, your body doesn't get enough oxygen and nutrients to meet its needs. These measures show some of the aspects of care provided to adults with heart failure.

This data is publicly reported on Hospital Compare, a healthcare quality monitoring site of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  Data reported on this site is often 6-12 months more current than data presented on quality monitoring websites.    Click here to view our data as reported on this site.   

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Heart Attack

An acute myocardial infarction (AMI), also called a heart attack, happens when one of the heart’s arteries becomes blocked and the supply of blood and oxygen to part of the heart muscle is slowed or stopped. When the heart muscle doesn’t get the oxygen and nutrients it needs, the affected heart tissue may die. These measures show some of the standards of care provided, if appropriate, for most adults who have had a heart attack. 

This data is publicly reported on Hospital Compare, a healthcare quality monitoring site of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  Data reported on this site is often 6-12 months more current than data presented on quality monitoring websites.    Click here to view our data as reported on this site.   

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